Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien nav lang search
Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

About the author

Torsten Weber

Torsten Weber
Modern East Asian History
Science Communication & Public Relations
Principal Researcher

As part of his research on the backwaters of Tokyo bla bla explores the theme. In his research bla bla. This has also been at the center of a number of presentaions and articles. Most recently bla bla.

First Blog Post

long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long

In the beginning

long long long long long long long long long long long long long longlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long text long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long longAfter comparing such ethnographic accounts of ritual food practices, the discussion dwelled upon the problem of religious food proscriptions and prescriptions as boundary makers.[17] long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long textlong long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long long text

Fussnote, Zitation, Keywords

[16] For a detailed overview over the ritual and symbolic connotations of chickpeas, grains, seeds and dry fruit and on festive foods containing them such as aşure (cooked among Muslims) anuşabur (an Armenian Christmas food) and koliva (a dish central in Greek orthodox mourning rites) see also: Sauner-Leroy, Marie Hélène, Temel Ezginin Üç Örneği: Aşure, Anuşabur, Koliva (Yemek ve Kültür, No. 13, 2008) 100-108. Sauner-Leroy (University Aix-Marseille/Galatasaray University Istanbul, http://cetobac.ehess.fr/index.php?1432) participated in July’s meeting.

[17] See Freidenreich, David M., Foreigners and Their Food. Constructing Otherness in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Law (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011). For an anecdote on the dangers of essentializing such legal proscriptions, cf. Ahmed, Shahab, What Is Islam? The Importance of Being Islamic (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2016), p. 3.

 

Citation: Voswinckel, Esther. “‘Saint Anthony’s Bread’ in Istanbul and ‘Problem-Solving Chickpeas’ in Iran: July’s Religion-Related Research Get-Together Was Dedicated to Food and Religion,” Orient-Institut Istanbul Blog, 14 August 2020. https://www.oiist.org/saint-anthonys-bread-in-istanbul-and-problem-solving-chickpeas-in-iran-julys-religion-related-research-get-together-dedicated-to-food-and-religio/

Keywords

Current events, Turkey, Iran, Islamicate World, 20th century, 21th century, OII-Religion