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Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

German Institute for Japanese Studies

Research focused on modern Japan, in global and regional perspectives. Located in one of the important economic and political hubs of East Asia, Tokyo.

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Events and Activities

Events
February 7, 2017

Book Launch: Social Inequality in Post-Growth Japan Transformation during Economic and Demographic Stagnation

Speakers:
David Chiavacci
Mercator Professor in Social Science of Japan, University of Zurich
Carola Hommerich
Associate Professor of Sociology, Hokkaido University
Sawako Shirahase
Professor of Sociology, The University of Tokyo

In recent decades Japan has changed from a strongly growing, economically successful country regarded as prime example of social equality and inclusion to a country with a stagnating economy, a shrinking population and a very high proportion of elderly people. New forms of inequality have been emerging and deepening, and a new perception of Japan as “gap society” (kakusa shakai) has become commonly acknowledged.
The book provides a comprehensive overview of inequality in contemporary Japan. It examines inequality in labor and employment, welfare and family, education and social mobility, in the urban-rural divide, and with regard to immigration, ethnic minorities and gender.

Events
January 26, 2017

The Ideologue and Activist Ōkawa Shūmei (1886-1957)

Ōkawa Shūmei is generally known for his involvement in the Japanese right-wing movement that led to his arrest after the “Incident of May 15” in 1932. Ōkawas activities after his release from prison in 1937 until his indictment as a war criminal in 1946 have not been explored widely.

Ōkawa was a prolific writer who covered diverse topics, including religion, Asianism, the Indian independence movement, colonial history, Japanese history and the “Japanese spirit”. This talk will summarize Ōkawas life, his thinking and his actions against the background of his times. In this context it will also explore the Japanese ideological concept of the “national essence” (kokutai), the tensions between collectivism and statism (kokka shugi) vs. individualism, and political utopianism in the Japanese far right before 1945.

Publications

Fully reserve backed money – a solution to Japan’s fiscal and monetary challenges

The paper argues that Japan’s legislators should use this window of opportunity to introduce 100% de jure reserve requirements for transfer deposits.

Such a move would not only take advantage of the benefits propagated by supporters of a reserve-backed regime. The implied BoJ’s balance sheet expansion would allow the Bank to further purchase JGBs. As the expansion would be permanent, the regime shift would not only stabilize the government’s fiscal condition, the BoJ, too, would no longer have to worry about exiting its policy of quantitative easing. Both the government and the central bank could focus on their primary policy goals.

Other
January 1, 2017

🐔 Frohes neues Jahr!

Das DIJ Tokyo wünscht ein erfolgreiches,
glückliches und vor allem friedliches Jahr

あけましておめでとうございます!

Other

Job opportunity: Two Postdoctoral Fellowship Positions

The Max Weber Foundation represented by the German Institute for Japanese Studies and the Departments of Geography and Southeast Asian Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, National University of Singapore, are seeking to appoint two postdoctoral fellows for the newly established research group on “Borders, Mobility and New Infrastructures“.

For more details please refer to:

http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/geog/
(Click on the link that says: “Job opportunity: Two Postdoctoral Fellowship Positions in Borders, Mobility and New Infrastructures, deadline 31 January 2017”)

For a direct link click here. (PDF, 29KB)

Events
December 8, 2016

Emperor Hirohito from the Pacific War to the Cold War

Emperor Showa, better known in the English-speaking world as Emperor Hirohito, has been one of the most controversial figures in the history of the Pacific War. He was both sovereign of the state and commander in chief of the Japanese imperial forces; but above all, he was the manifestation of divinity and a symbol of the national and cultural identity of Japan. Yet under the Allied occupation the emperor was spared from the Tokyo war crimes trial and continued to reign in postwar Japan until his death in 1989 as “the symbol of the state and of the unity of the people” under the new democratic constitution written by the U.S. occupiers.

This talk will examine the extraordinary transformation of Emperor Hirohito from a divine monarch during the Pacific War to a humanized symbolic monarch supposedly with no political power during the occupation years (1945-1952). The talk will focus on the paradoxical role Emperor Hirohito played at home and abroad as tension between the United States and the Soviet Union escalated into the Cold War in East Asia.

Events
November 30, 2016

Effects of Zero Interest Rate Monetary Policy on Banks and Society

In Japan, zero interest rate monetary policy and unconventional easing measures have prevailed for almost two decades. It is possible that these policies have had incisive side-effects aside from effects on inflation (expectations).

Our roundtable will focus on the implications of these measures for banks and society by way of macro-economic theory as well as empirical evidence.

Events
November 29, 2016

Between Nostalgia and Utopia: Alternative Lifestyles in Rural Japan

The Japanese countryside has for decades seen its population shrinking and aging. But in recent years some regions have experienced an influx of new residents, urban-to-rural migrants, looking for a new life in the Japanese countryside.

This so-called I-turn trend has been increasingly covered by the popular media. Magazines and websites providing information and support for people interested in moving to rural areas suggest that life in the countryside promises a meaningful job, a good work-life-balance, a life close to nature and a small, supportive community. They evoke an image of a nostalgic picturesque ‘homeland’ (furusato), where an ‘old Japanese way of life’ has been preserved. But what story does the individual I-turner tell?

Current Events

March 31, 2017
  • Workshop
    10:00 ~ 18:30

    "Humans & Machines in Medical Contexts: Case Studies from Japan"


Call for Papers

Contemporary Japan
Issue 30, No. 1

Max Weber Foundation
Conference 2017

German Historical Institute, Moscow
“Revolutionary Biographies in the 19th and 20th Century. Imperial – Inter/national – Decolonial”

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Jochi Kioizaka Bldg. 2F
7-1 Kioicho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
102-0094 Japan
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+81 (0)3 3222-5420
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"Will Japan’s 'Womenomics' work?" t.co/hVkhwth1bb via @MedillChicago & @NoelleTAKAHASHI

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[💡 DIJ Study Group ] "Towards an Intellectual History of Japan’s 1980s Bubble Culture and Economy" 📅 2017/03/23 🔎 t.co/X9B1w9xcJ6

 

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