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Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

Wir sind ein deutsches Forschungsinstitut mit Sitz in Tokyo. Unsere Forschung befasst sich mit dem modernen Japan im globalen Kontext.

Mehr Infos

Veranstaltungen und Aktivitäten

Andere
Events

Das DIJ auf der diesjährigen ICAS 11


Bei der diesjährigen ICAS 11 Konferenz in Leiden war das DIJ mit drei Vorträgen präsent von Barbara Holthus, Hanno Jentzsch und Nora Kottmann. Darüberhinaus hatte die Max Weber Stiftung einen Informationsstand, auf dem das DIJ auch mit diversen Publikationen und Informationen vertreten war.

Für einen ausführlichen Bericht dazu, siehe hier.

Events
12. September 2019

Wielding Toxic Discourse: Insanity in the Nuclear Narratives of Chernobyl and Fukushima

Environmental scholar Lawrence Buell defined toxic discourse as a mode of writing that expresses “anxiety arising from a perceived threat of environmental hazard“ (2003, 30-31). Fictional works from the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents feature characters who appear to be mentally unstable because of this anxiety. Rather than their insanity discrediting them in the eyes of the nuclear industry, this presentation draws inspiration from Buell to consider how insanity can be used by victims of nuclear disasters to claim authority through toxic discourse by crafting narratives of resistance. One of the most controversial images stemming from nuclear disasters is of people who remain in highly irradiated areas unfit for human habitation. In novels by Kimura Yūsuke (Sacred Cesium Ground and Isa’s Deluge) and Alina Bronsky (Baba Dunja’s Last Love), the so-called insanity of these characters allows them to comment critically on the postdisaster situation, specifically the evaluation of risk and the bankruptcy of credibility. They provide insightful voices of resistance to the narratives of containment and safety perpetuated by the government and nuclear industry. The presentation ends with a consideration of actual residents in contaminated zones in Kamanaka Hitomi’s documentary Little Voices from Fukushima.

Speaker:
Rachel DiNitto, University of Oregon

Events
17. September 2019

The Politics of Migration in Japan


Over the last ten years the reported number of migrant workers in Japan has more than tripled, reaching almost 1.5 million in 2018. This unprecedented high number of foreigners migrating to work and live in Japan requires policy makers and academics to understand what is happening, why and how. We will take up the issue from the perspective of political science.

What do political parties have to say about the issue? What are their policy proposals, who is pushing them, and how high does immigration rank on the respective political agendas?

Events
19. September 2019

Renewable Energy in Germany and Japan – Prospects for the Citizen Energy Movement

Citizen energy, known as “Bürgerenergie”, forms a major pillar of the transition to renewable energies (RE) in Germany. From as early as the 1990s German citizens pioneered in in solar and wind power or biomass energy projects and invested into RE as individual households, companies or as members within more than 900 energy cooperatives. Similarly, though less known, Japan as well has a long-established vibrant citizen energy movement, also referred to as “community power”. While initially focusing on building RE capacity, a growing number of citizen energy companies ventured into direct marketing of “green energy”.

The shift from a feed-in-tariff (FIT) to a feed-in-premium (FIP) and auction scheme, the institutional framework for grid integration, the deregulation of electricity markets, but also the changing social acceptance of RE and the ecological consciousness among the wider public present major challenges for citizen energy projects and their business models. Highlighting differences in the regulatory environment and public opinion, our speakers will be comparing the development of citizen energy in Germany and Japan. Despite differences, the citizen energy movement in both countries is presently challenged by tighter regulations for RE, growing local resistance to RE projects, and barriers to market integration. At the same time, direct markets for “green energy” are underdeveloped in Japan and, albeit more developed, contribute little to the expansion of renewables in Germany. Eiji Oishi will comment the discussion from a practitioner and business point of view.

Speakers:
Carsten Herbes, Nuertingen-Geislingen University, Germany
Jörg Raupach-Sumiya, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka
Eiji Oishi, Minna Denryoku, Tokyo

Events
26. September 2019

Citizen Science in the Digital Age
– Engaging civil society in social science and humanities research –

The progress of digital technology creates new opportunities in all areas of the civil soci-ety. The expansion of citizen science is one example. With citizens taking part in re-search activities, their understanding about science deepens. At the same time, civic engagement can support and advance scientific research. Nevertheless, compared to the natural sciences, practices of citizen science in the social sciences and the humanities (SSH) are still rare.

Combining experiences and insights by leading experts from Japan and abroad, our conference will take a closer look at the opportunities and challenges for citizen science in SSH. Where and how can civil society get engaged? What are the potential benefits? What risks need to be addressed? How can respective collaborations be initiated and coordinated? How will this effect both society and research in SSH?

Events
4. Oktober 2019

Universities in the Digital Age

Japan’s and Germany’s ambitious national frameworks of Society 5.0 and Industry 4.0 acknowledge the importance of education and research as key success factors in the digital transformation. Universities are not only to develop the necessary human capital and to contribute to technological advances, they are also to play key roles with regard to social inclusion and life-long learning. To do so, they are expected to deepen and widen cross-organizational and international cooperation. Last, but not least they are urged to adjust their core activities of teaching, research and administration to take advantage of new digital technologies. How are universities in Germany and Japan responding to these challenges? How do they see themselves affected? What strategies do they pursue? Our two speakers are best suited to answer these questions based on their leading positions and professional careers in higher education and research institutions in Germany and Japan.

Speakers:
Bernd Huber, President of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Miho Funamori, Strategy Manager at the Research Center for Open Science and Data Platform at National Institute of Informatics

Events
1. August 2019

The Mountains Belong to Everybody? Conflicts about Recreational Forest Use in Austria and Japan

Recreational outdoor sports, such as hiking, mountain biking, and trail running are enjoying increased popularity in Japan and worldwide. Proponents argue that these activities contribute to physical and mental health on the one hand and bring about economic and social benefits for rural areas on the other. At the same time there are concerns of over-use and environmental degradation. Focusing on mountain biking, Prof. Yuichiro Hirano and Prof. Wolfram Manzenreiter will be comparing the current situation in Austria and Japan and try to line out possible futures for sustainable outdoor tourism that benefits rural areas and protect the environment equally.

Speakers:
Yuichiro Hirano, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba
Wolfram Manzenreiter, University of Vienna

Publikationen

DIJ Newsletter 59 published

Bericht: Diversität und Produktivität – Japans Beschäftigungssystem auf dem Prüfstand
Viele Industrieländer müssen die mit einem verschärften globalen Wettbewerb und einem schnellen technologischen Wandel verbundenen Herausforderungen im Kontext einer rasch alternden Bevölkerung bewältigen. Für alle gelten dabei grundsätzlich die gleichen Lösungen: Erhöhung der Erwerbsbeteiligung von Frauen und älteren Menschen, Einstellung von mehr ausländischen Arbeitskräften, Investitionen in Bildung sowie Automatisierung von Produktion und Dienstleistungen. Die dabei angesprochen Schlüsselfaktoren sind Diversität und Produktivität.

Neue Ära: Japans neue Ära hat einen Namen: Reiwa
Es war kein Aprilscherz: am 1. April verkündete Chefkabinettssekretär Yoshihide Suga Reiwa als neues nengō (auch gengō). Unter dieser Devise – flexibel übersetzbar als „Japan herrsche“ oder „angeordneter Frieden“ – stehen die Thronjahre des neuen Kaisers Naruhito seit dem 1. Mai 2019.

DFG-Projekt: Nankinger Kriegstagebücher
Als japanische Truppen im Herbst 1937 auf die chinesische Hauptstadt Nanking vorrücken, entscheidet sich der deutsche Siemens-Repräsentant John Rabe (1882-1950) nicht zu flüchten, sondern in Nanking zu bleiben.

Nächste Veranstaltungen

12. September 2019
  • DIJ History & Humanities Study Group
    18:30 ~ 20:30

    Wielding Toxic Discourse: Insanity in the Nuclear Narratives of Chernobyl and Fukushima

17. September 2019
  • Symposien und Konferenzen
    09:00 ~ 18:00

    The Politics of Migration in Japan

19. September 2019
  • DIJ Forum
    18:30 ~ 20:30

    Renewable Energy in Germany and Japan - Prospects for the Citizen Energy Movement

26. September 2019
  • Symposien und Konferenzen
    ~ whole day event ~

    Citizen Science in the Digital Age

4. Oktober 2019
  • DIJ Forum
    18:30 ~ 20:30

    Universities in the Digital Age

Information

Unsere Bibliothek bleibt
vom 19.08. – 27.08.2019 geschlossen.

Projekt: Tokyo Olympics

„Japan through the lens of the Tokyo Olympics“

Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf unserer → Projektseite.

Monographienreihe

Die Monographien des DIJ sind ab sofort
Open Access Open Access.

Downloads sind direkt hier verfügbar:
→ DIJ Monographien.

Bitte beachten Sie: Ausgaben sind ein Jahr nach der Erstveröffentlichung als Open Access verfügbar.

Join Us!

Das Institut sucht zu Beginn des Jahres 2020 eine Mitarbeiterin / einen Mitarbeiter (PDF, 68 KB).

DIJ 30th Anniversary

Anniversary Event

In October 2018 we celebrated the DIJ’s foundation 30 years ago — with lots of inspiring speeches and fruitful conversations.

→ Event page

Anniversary Booklet

„30 Years Interdisciplinary Research on Site. 1988 – 2018“

Our anniversary booklet gives an overview of the past 30 years here at the DIJ.
Available for download now!

→ Publication page

Call for Papers

Contemporary Japan
Ausgabe 32, Nr. 2
bis 1. August 2019

Contemporary Japan
Special Issue
bis 31. Juli 2019

Exlibris

DIJ Monographien, Volume 62

DIJ Monographien, Volume 62

„Parental well-being. Satisfaction with work, family life, and family policy in Germany and Japan“
— by Barbara Holthus and Hans Bertram

Twitter|@dij_tokyo

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Barbara Holthus
@barbGhawaii

The twitter account @dij_Tokyo2020 for our upcoming open access book on #Tokyo2020 just got an overhaul and new na… t.co/JAr5ljA7Ot

Retweeted von DIJ Tokyo
DIJ Tokyo's Twitter avatar
DIJ Tokyo
@dij_tokyo

Upcoming! 💡🔜 #DIJForum: "Renewable Energy in Germany and Japan - Prospects for the Citizen Energy Movement" 👤 Spe… t.co/KLfqWxBlHe

DIJ Tokyo's Twitter avatar
DIJ Tokyo
@dij_tokyo

💡🔜 Upcoming conference! "The Politics of Migration in Japan" ✍️ Info & free registration: 🌐… t.co/N1gOfcqrJr

 


 
 
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