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Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

Wir sind ein deutsches Forschungsinstitut mit Sitz in Tokyo. Unsere Forschung befasst sich mit dem modernen Japan im globalen Kontext.

Mehr Infos

Veranstaltungen und Aktivitäten

Events
22. Mai 2019

Merits and Challenges of Deliberative Democracy in Japan

Like other representative democracies, Japan has been facing democratic challenges which have eroded democratic representation, political accountability and legitimacy. The voter-turn-out for the last Lower House elections, for instance, was at a record low. Consequently, the legitimacy of the parliamentary representatives was diminished. Decreasing trust in state elites has additionally fueled the political abstinence. To counteract this (partial) democratic “crisis”, Japanese national and local governments have implemented numerous democratic innovations, or in other words new institutionalized forms of participatory decision-making processes, especially deliberations.

Based on theoretical concepts dealing with the quality of democracy and with democratic innovations (Diamond and Morlino 2005; Smith 2009; Geissel 2012), this talk asks whether implementing deliberations can counteract the “crisis” of Japanese representative democracy. Therefore, two deliberative methods, namely mini-publics and deliberative polls, are evaluated in this talk.

Speaker:
Momoyo Hüstebeck, University of Duisburg-Essen

Events
23. Mai 2019

Androids and Virtual Reality – Simulations of the Human in Japanese Theatre

Contemporary artists are increasingly creating works that lack the presence of the human, as if to imagine a posthuman world, a posthumous world, a world without us. Such posthuman use of androids draws attention to the significance of negotiating different states of perception and transcending established value systems to sustain a viable position in a global world. But the human instinct to create images of ourselves is still strong, as we see not only in the androids used in the robot theatre of Ishiguro Hiroshi and Hirata Oriza, but also in such popular virtual idols as Hatsune Miku. Prof. Mari Boyd will situate the new 21st century development in Japanese robot/android theatre in two contexts: first, the karakuri (trick) automata popular from the 17th century and, second, the present national push in branding Japan as a society 5.0, i.e. a technology-based society emerging through the fourth industrial revolution.

Speakers:
Mari Boyd, Sophia University, Tokyo
M. Cody Poulton, University of Victoria, Canada

Event Series
3. Juni 2019

Technologies of Presence: Modeling Emotion in Robots with Heart

Intersections between entertainment industries and artificial intelligence research in Japan have resulted in a growing interest in modeling affect and emotion for use across a variety of media platforms, including wearable devices, virtual reality, and in particular companion robots. Combining advances in computing with market explorations in technologies of care and companionship, the most recent social robots created for popular consumption in Japan augment a sense of presence and intimacy by literally giving these platforms a face. This attention to the design and ascription of agency to media technologies enables a feeling of co-awareness that incorporates non-human entities into the social network of relationships. Moreover, as these robots connect human users while also inviting them to interact directly with robot bodies via tactile features such as furry bodies and wagging tails, with sensors connected to cloud-based artificial intelligence, they not only facilitate affective interactions but also enable the collection of new kinds of emotional data.

Speakers:
Daniel White, Freie Universität Berlin
Hirofumi Katsuno, Doshisha University

Please note, this Social Science Study Group will take place on June, Monday 3rd

Events
12. Juni 2019

Making the Most of Scarcity? The Role of Natural Assets in Pre-WWII Japanese Economic Development

What role did natural assets play in the rise of living standards in industrializing nations during the 19th and 20th century? In the case of Japan, initial conditions were characterized by an exceptionally efficient use, by the international standards of the time, of very scarce natural resources, particularly in forestry and silviculture (Totman 1989; Saito 2009, 2014). In spite of their scarcity, natural assets played a critical role in the initial phase of Japanese economic transformation, in the late Tokugawa and early Meiji. In this paper, we estimate the evolution of the comprehensive wealth, the total stock of assets per capita, which includes human and natural assets, and can be regarded as the most relevant indicator of sustainable well-being (Dasgupta 2001, 2009).

Speaker:
Jean-Pascal Bassino, ENS Lyon; CNRS research fellow at the French Research Institute on Japan at Maison Franco Japonaise

Andere

Stellenangebot
Wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in

Das DIJ sucht eine/n wissenschaftliche/n Mitarbeiter/in mit Forschungsschwerpunkt in den Geistes-, Sozial- oder Wirtschaftswissenschaften des modernen Japan, auch im globalen Kontext.

Erwartet wird selbständige wissenschaftliche Arbeit an einem Forschungsprojekt, das sich aus sozial- oder geisteswissenschaftlicher Sicht mit Fragen der digitalen Transformation befasst. Durch Studium nachgewiesene Kenntnisse auf dem Gebiet der Mathematik und/oder Informatik sind wünschenswert.

Bewerber/innen sollen ein Konzept zu Ihrem Forschungsvorhaben vorlegen, das Fragestellung(en) und Methode(n) erläutert und darüber hinaus auch Anknüpfungspunkte an aktuelle internationale Forschung und Möglichkeiten der Kooperation mit Partnern in Japan, Deutschland oder Drittländern aufzeigt.

Neben der Forschung wird auch die Mitarbeit an allgemeinen Institutsaufgaben erwartet. Der Arbeitsort ist Tokyo.

Weitere Informationen (PDF, 45 KB)

Events
14. Mai 2019

How Can We Explain the Lag of Japan’s Sharing Economy?

In recent years, the emergence of “sharing economy” has brought people plenty of conveniences to collaboratively make use of under-utilized inventory through fee-based sharing. The topic of the sharing economy has also caught attention in public and academic debate. According to Yano Institute, the size of the Japanese sharing economy by transaction is 0.64 billion USD in 2017 and is estimated to reach only about 1.24 billion USD by 2022, which is relatively weak compared with other developed countries and even some developing countries. The Japanese Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications also states that the size of Japan’s sharing economy is relatively small. This research tries to seek answers to the question of why Japan’s sharing economy has evolved relatively slowly. Because there is no existing theory to explain the lag of Japan’s sharing economy, this research regards the sharing economy as a new form of process innovation that creates a new way for people to get access to goods and services. Taking a macro perspective theoretically informed by the National Systems of Innovation (NSI) literature, this research adopts semi-structured interviews to acquire in-depth insights from industry insiders.

Speaker:
Junxi Yao, University of Sheffield

Events
18. April 2019

Protecting Children in Family Separation

As Japan has the sole custody system after divorce, there are a number of parental disputes over child custody and visitation or access nowadays. Currently, only 1/3 of children with divorced parents can have access to their non-custodial parent, and only 1/4 of children obtain child support from their non-custodial parent. In contrast, Germany and other Western countries have implemented joint custody after divorce, which requires both parents to consult with each other and take joint decisions in relation to long-term issues concerning their children.

The divergent legal settings and societal conditions between Japan and Western countries yield difficult questions in a cross-border family separation. Prof. Nishitani will address the historical, legal and societal background of these differences in family law institutions between Japan and Western countries with a particular focus on Germany. Prof. Odagiri will show what we have learned about the impact of divorce on children from research in psychology and what actions are now being taken.

Speakers:
Yuko Nishitani, Kyoto University
Noriko Odagiri, Tokyo International University

Events
13. März 2019

Autonomy, Belonging and Long-Distance Relationships in Europe and Japan

Individualization and mobility increasingly define romantic relationships. ‘Despatialization’ and internationalization of work and education have intensified tensions between occupation and relationships. Therefore, as couples negotiate and coordinate their lives, flexibility and agency become more necessary to sustain relationships. Decisions along the life course demand privileging either individual autonomy or dyadic belonging. As all options likely imply trade-offs, actors will try to balance autonomy and belonging. This is for example the case in long-distance relationships (LDR), which can be seen as ‘solutions’ to systemic challenges, that, however, cause new challenges. Against this background, my talk asks how long-distance couples ‘manage’ distance, belonging and their life courses.

Speaker
Markus Klingel, Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences

Nächste Veranstaltungen

22. Mai 2019
  • DIJ Social Science Study Group
    18:30 ~ 20:00

    "Merits and Challenges of Deliberative Democracy in Japan"

23. Mai 2019
  • DIJ Forum
    18:30 ~ 20:30

    Androids and Virtual Reality – Simulations of the Human in Japanese Theatre

3. Juni 2019
  • DIJ Social Science Study Group
    18:30 ~ 20:30

    Technologies of Presence: Modeling Emotion in Robots with Heart

12. Juni 2019
  • DIJ Business & Economics Study Group
    18:30 ~ 20:00

    Making the Most of Scarcity? The Role of Natural Assets in Pre-WWII Japanese Economic Development

DIJ 30th Anniversary

Anniversary Event

In October 2018 we celebrated the DIJ’s foundation 30 years ago — with lots of inspiring speeches and fruitful conversations.

→ Event page

Anniversary Booklet

„30 Years Interdisciplinary Research on Site. 1988 – 2018“

Our anniversary booklet gives an overview of the past 30 years here at the DIJ.
Available for download now!

→ Publication page

Call for Papers

Contemporary Japan
Ausgabe 32, Nr. 2
bis 1. August 2019

Exlibris

DIJ Monographien, Volume 62

DIJ Monographien, Volume 62

„Parental well-being. Satisfaction with work, family life, and family policy in Germany and Japan“
— by Barbara Holthus and Hans Bertram

Twitter|@dij_tokyo

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📊💡 Upcoming! #DIJStudyGroup on 🔜 June 3rd: "Technologies of Presence: Modeling Emotion in Robots with Heart" 👤 Sp… t.co/0kb9o9rW1Q

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Upcoming! 💡🔜 #DIJForum: "Androids and Virtual Reality – Simulations of the Human in Japanese Theatre" 👤 Speaker:… t.co/I7X5XGb0G7

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🎈イベント🎈 5月23日  #初音ミク #オトナロイド をはじめとした #ボーカロイド#アンドロイド と演劇やポップカルチャーの発展についてのイベントがドイツ日本研究所@dij_tokyoにて開催されます.t.co/JgFyqEJsET

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