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Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien

Wir sind ein deutsches Forschungsinstitut mit Sitz in Tokyo. Unsere Forschung befasst sich mit dem modernen Japan im globalen Kontext.

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Veranstaltungen und Aktivitäten

Event Series
Events
20. Oktober 2021

DIJ lecture on female rakugo performers on Tokyo’s stages

Screenshot suika rakugo

When talking about traditional Japanese stage-arts, many think of men in kimono. In most stage arts, to this day, female performers are either not trained at all or trained but not accepted to perform in their respective schools’ main stages. Today, about 5% of Tokyo’s rakugo performers are female and most enjoy a big fan following. However, the portfolio of rakugo stories has been created by men for mostly male audiences. This presentation gives an historic overview of the development of the involvement of female performers on Tokyo’s yose stages and discusses the different approaches they take on-stage, particularly looking into issues such as modification of stories, voice, tone, appearance and stage persona. This session of the DIJ History and Humanities Study Group is part of the DIJ Gender and Sexuality in East Asia Lecture Series. Details and registration here

Speaker:
Sarah Stark, University of Ghent

Event Series
Events
21. Oktober 2021

Fourth Web Forum Series ‘DT’ session on the Future of Society

© Gerd Altmann

Yuko Harayama (Council for Science, Technology and Innovation of Japan), Dietmar Harhoff (Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition), and Ulrike Schaede (University of California San Diego) will be the speakers in the fourth session of our MWS Web Forum Series ‘The Digital Transformation’ on October 21. Its focus will be on ‘The Future of Society – National Ambitions and Strategies’. Yuko Harayama’s paper „How to use ‚Society 5.0‘?“ will introduce the concept and explain its use in Japan and the interest it has attracted abroad. In his presentation „Reconsidering German National Strategies towards Digitalization“, Dietmar Harhoff will focus on the government’s strategic plan ‚Industrie 4.0′, its national AI strategy, and initiatives to accelerate the digitalization of the public sector. Ulrike Schaede’s paper „National Differences in Preparing for the Digital Disruption: Markets v. Industrial Policy“ will compare Japan’s reliance on industrial policy, the US‘ focus on markets and private initiatives, and Germany’s in-between position. Details and registration here

Events
1. Oktober 2021

Joint book exhibition ‚World Heritage in Japan‘ in October

Japan is home to no less than 25 UNESCO World Heritage sites, including Himeji Castle, Hiroshima Peace Memorial, and Mount Fuji. In July, two new sites in Japan were added to this list: the first comprises Amami-Oshima Island, Tokunoshima Island, northern part of Okinawa Island, and Iriomote Island (Kagoshima and Okinawa prefectures); the second are Jomon Prehistoric Sites in Northern Japan (Hokkaido, Aomori, Iwate, and Akita prefectures). In this year’s joint autumn book exhibition, the International House of Japan Library, the Bibliothèque de la Maison franco-japonaise , and the DIJ’s library are displaying English, French, and German materials on Japan’s World Heritage sites. The exhibition takes place from October 1st to October 30th. For further information, please contact each library. Details here

Event Series
Events
14. Oktober 2021

Web Forum Series ‘DT’ on Data Infrastructures and Open Science

© Gerd Altmann

Miho Funamori (National Institute of Informatics), Jeroen Sondervan (Utrecht University), and Helmuth Trischler (Deutsches Museum and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich) will be the speakers in the third session of our MWS Web Forum Series ‘The Digital Transformation’ on October 14. This session’s focus will be on ‚Data Infrastructures and Open Science‘. Miho Funamori’s paper „Who owns research data at universities?“ will provide an analysis of research data management practices and policies from the perspective of university management. In his presentation „Notions on the differences in form and speed of the transformation to Open Science in Europe“, Jeroen Sondervan will give an overview of open science policy developments in Europe and will take the developments at Utrecht University as an example. Helmuth Trischler’s paper „Why and how should we establish research data infrastructures in the historical sciences?“ will present recent initiatives to create research data infrastructures according to the FAIR principles in Germany. Details and registration here

Events
14. Oktober 2021

Barbara Holthus gives talk on Tokyo Olympic volunteers at Princeton University

© Princeton University

DIJ deputy director Barbara Holthus will give an online talk on her research into Tokyo Olympic volunteers at Princeton University. Her presentation „Smiling behind the mask: Tokyo Olympics and its volunteers“ on Thursday, October 14, 8 a.m. JST is sponsored by Princeton’s East Asia Studies Program. In her talk, Barbara will  particularly focus on the Field Cast – the Olympic and Paralympic volunteers. Volunteering was supposed to get a huge boost in popularity in Japanese society. Yet thousands of volunteers either were let go due to the ban on spectators, or they quit their (unpaid) jobs. Fieldwork through participant observation highlights the heterogeneity of those volunteers that remained, shedding light on their motivations and dreams – and what they took away from the experience. For more information on research related to the Olympics, see the DIJ’s special project on the Tokyo Olympics and the open access book publication Japan Through the Lens of the Tokyo Olympics

Events
8. Oktober 2021

DIJ researchers discuss Olympic legacy at online workshop

© GIGA

The Tokyo Olympics 2020 are history but two months after the closing ceremony it is far from clear what remains as their legacy: have they spread the virus or the Olympic message? Have they uplifted Japan and further aggravated Japan’s identity crisis? DIJ deputy director Barbara Holthus („Tainted Love: Volunteering for the Pandemic Olympics“) and principal researcher Sonja Ganseforth („From ‚No Olympics 2020‘ to ‚NOlympics Anywhere‘: Reflecting on the Anti-Olympic Movements in Japan before and after Tokyo 2020/1“) will share their insights into how Tokyo 2020 has transformed Japanese society at the online workshop Post-Olympics Japan: Renewal or Failure? Barbara will also be a panelist in the workshop’s closing panel discussion on „What Remains?“. Both are contributors to the DIJ’s special project on the Tokyo Olympics and the open access book publication Japan Through the Lens of the Tokyo Olympics. The workshop is organized by the German Institute for Global and Area Studies, the University of Zurich, and the German Association for Social Science Research on Japan. Details and registration here

Events
7. Oktober 2021

Workshop on concepts, agents, and global experiences of Fascism

© DIJ Tokyo

Beyond the cases of Italy and Nazi Germany, a variety of patterns of fascism and authoritarianism took shape as responses to the unprecedented economic slump and social unrest during the interwar period. However, mainstream studies of fascism still have their focus on European cases. By shedding light on regions that remain underrepresented in studies of fascism, this three-day online workshop aims to trace the border-transcending circulation of ideas and concepts derived from fascism and to grasp its transnational character. With the case studies zooming in on regions such as China, Japan, India, Cambodia, Thailand, Brazil, and Romania, this workshop showcases the large-scale border-crossing movement of concepts and explores the multi-layered intellectual inspirations of agents from various backgrounds. The workshop is organized by the DIJ in cooperation with the School of Humanities, Kwansei Gakuin University. Details and registration here

Event Series
Events
7. Oktober 2021

DIJ Study Group talk discusses Japan’s economic management

Back in the 1970s, Japanese policymakers earned the reputation of being the most competent within advanced economies for successfully weathering the second oil shock. Where has this reputation gone? The high growth of the late 1980s proved to be transient as a succession of financial crises led to the „lost decade“ of the 1990s. Ben Bernanke (1999) famously described the initial measures to fight deflation that would dominate the 2000s as „a self-induced paralysis“. A more forceful set of policies called „Abenomics“ in the 2010s ultimately failed to achieve its ambitious goals of 2% GDP growth and 2% inflation, a shortcoming blamed on either error in design or pusillanimity in implementation. This presentation focuses on three cases (the lost decade, Abenomics, Covid-19) to discuss to what extent the narrative of a never-ending crisis reflects hindsight bias, theoretical assumptions, and narrowly defined comparisons. Details and registration here

Speaker:
Brieuc Monfort, Sophia University

Nächste Veranstaltungen

1. Oktober – 30. Oktober 2021

Buchausstellung „Welterbe in Japan“

20. Oktober 2021
  • DIJ Lecture Series Gender and Sexuality in East Asia
    18:30 ~ 20:00

    From learning good manners to training one’s own apprentices: Female rakugo performers on Tokyo’s stages

21. Oktober 2021
  • MWS Web Forum Series 'The Digital Transformation'
    21:00 ~ 23:00

    The Future of Society – National Ambitions and Strategies

Vorübergehende Schließung des Instituts

Einer Empfehlung des japanischen Ministeriums für Gesundheit, Arbeit und Wohlfahrt bezüglich Maßnahmen zur Eindämmung des Coronavirus folgend bleibt das Institut (inkl. Bibliothek) bis auf Weiteres für Publikumsverkehr geschlossen. Falls Sie Interesse haben, unsere Buchausstellung zum Welterbe in Japan zu besuchen, setzen Sie sich bitte vorab per Email dijbibli@dijtokyo.org mit unserer Bibliothek in Verbindung.

DIJ Forschung zum 11. März

Eine Übersicht über aktuelle Publikationen und Aktivitäten des Instituts und seiner Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler zu den Folgen der Dreifachkatastrophe vor zehn Jahren finden Sie auf unserer Sonderseite 10 Years After 3.11 – A Collection of DIJ Research on the ‚Triple Disaster‘


What are different national ambitions and strategies to create The Future of Society? Find out in session 4 of our online #DX Web Forum Series, Thu Oct 21, 9-11 pm JST, with Yuko Harayama @riken_en, @UlrikeSchaede @GPS_UCSD & ... @DietmarHarhoff @mpi_inno_comp http://dij.tokyo/future

Did you know that about 5% of Tokyo’s #rakugo performers are female and most enjoy a big fan following, incl. @s_sui_s? Join us next Wed, 20 Oct, for an online presentation by @SarahStarkTYO to find out more about female rakugo performers... #DIJStudyGroup http://dij.tokyo/rakugo

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Sonderprojekt:
Tokyo Olympics

„Japan through the lens of the Tokyo Olympics“

Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf unserer → Projektseite.

DIJ Monographienreihe

Unsere Monographien sind nach einem einjährigen Embargo Open Access Open Access und können hier heruntergeladen werden:
→ DIJ Monographien

Call for Submissions

Contemporary Japan
Aktuelle Ausgabe Vol. 33, Nr. 2
Contemporary Japan akzeptiert Einsendungen ganzjährig ohne Abgabefrist. Zur Veröffentlichung angenommene Artikel werden umgehend online publiziert. Weitere Details finden Sie hier.

Wegbeschreibung

DIJ Tokyo
Jochi Kioizaka Bldg. 2F
7-1 Kioicho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
102-0094 Japan
Wegbeschreibung

+81 (0)3 3222-5077
+81 (0)3 3222-5420
dijtokyo@dijtokyo.org

 


 

Max Weber Foundation Research Group on Borders, Mobility and New Infrastructures


 

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