Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien nav lang search
日本語EnglishDeutsch
Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien
Population Decline and Ageing in Japan – The Social Consequences

Details

2007, ISBN 9780415401258, £75.00, Routledge, London, New York, 176 p.

Authors

Coulmas, Florian

Reviews

Campbell, John Creighton
Japan's Aging Population: Perspectives of "Catastrophic Demography" The Journal of Asian Studies Vol.67, No 4
pp. 1401-1406

Usui, Chikako
Population Decline and Ageing in Japan - The Social Consequences Journal of Japanese Studies 35:2 (2009)
pp. 464-470


Campbell, Ruth
Population Decline and Ageing in Japan - The Social Consequences Pacific Affair: Volume 81, No.3 - Fall 2008
pp. 471-472

Kingston, Jeff
The challenges of an aging society The Japan Times
p. 13

Schoettli, Urs
Japans demografische Revolution Neue Zürcher Zeitung

Population Decline and Ageing in Japan - The Social Consequences

Population Decline and Ageing in Japan – The Social Consequences

This book presents a comprehensive analysis of one of the most pressing
challenges facing Japan today: population decline and ageing.

It argues that social ageing is a phenomenon that follows in the wake
of industrialization, urbanization and social modernization, bringing
about changes in values, institutions, social structures, economic
activity, technology and culture, and posing many challenges for the
countries affected. Focusing on the experience of Japan, the author
explores:

  • how Japan has recognized the emerging problems relatively
    early because during the past half century population ageing has been
    more rapid in Japan than in any other country
  • how all of Japanese society is affected by social ageing,
    not just certain substructures and institutions, and explains its
    complex causes, describes the resulting challenges and analyses the
    solutions under consideration to deal with it
  • the nature of Japan’s population dynamics since 1920, and
    argues that Japan is rapidly moving in the direction of a ‘hyperaged
    society’ in which those sixty-five or older account for twenty-five per
    cent of the total population
  • the implications for family structures and other social
    networks, gender roles and employment patterns, health care and welfare
    provision, pension systems, immigration policy, consumer and voting
    behaviour and the cultural reactions and ramifications of social ageing.

DIJ Projects

Challenges of Demographic Change